Work In Progress
Protecting Passwords

Hmmm . . ., inc.
1048 Goodlette-Frank Road   Suite 203,   Naples, FL 34102
email   tel 239-404-5321   fax 239.261.9160

Hmmm . . ., inc. is where I post the products, programs and projects for which we have been instrumental getting them to market. Most of these were undertaken when I said to myself, "Hmmm, I wonder where I can buy that?" or "Hmmm, couldn't these two or three things be recombined or reconstituted to provide this new thing?"

This has led to 4 patents and trademarks. It has also led me to finding out that the niche market I was interested in already was being adequately served by others.

Presently, we are focusing on ProtectWords (aka SecureWord). It is for those of us who need to refer to a written down PIN, safe combination, padlock dial or access code either because we have too many to keep straight or because we don't use them often enough to be sure we have the one we need to use right now exactly right.

Just about everyone associated in any way with the security business understands the risks of

  • having the same PIN serve multiple accounts
  • using numbers which have personal meaning such as birth or marriage dates, etc.
Yet, many - just like you and I - think it's safer than carrying them around on a piece of paper . . . even scrambled up.

This was my set of blinders: "I'm too small for anyone to break into any of my accounts Well gues what? There are computer savvy folks in other lands for whom our pittances are small fortunes!

When this became clear to me it led to one of my "hmmm" moments: Why not bring the 19th Century way of remembering numbers into the 21st only vastly expanding it with digital technology? And also borrow a page from Edgar Allan Poe to hide it in plain sight?

The U.S. Patent Office agreed that this was something new and unique. Below is a video overview.

Like to try it for yourself? We'll have a demo version (pre-Beta) up soon with password protected access. Just . We'll let you know the day it's up and running.

Some that worked

Some that didn't